The Cinema Cafe

Serving Cinema's Tastiest Treasures

Inspecting Hidden Gem #19: Devil's Doorway

DEVIL'S DOORWAY





U.S. / MGM / 1950 / B+W / 84 minutes / Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1


During America's Civil War years the Union Army welcomed Native American volunteers to fight on their side. If these soldiers thought that their inclusion signaled an end to the shameful treatment they received from the American Government they were dead wrong. Stripped of their land, many were forced to march long distances to settle on reservations and, if "lucky" enough to survive, faced further hardships like starvation, disease and abusive treatment once they arrived. 

Hollywood typically ignored the extreme injustice perpetrated on Native Americans (i.e. broken treaties, stolen land) and atrocities (such as murder, rape and imprisonment). If Indians did make an on screen appearance they would most often be presented as faceless savages and aggressors without any of the humanity lavishly afforded to the whites.

There have been exceptions in Tinsel-town: John Ford showed courage in portraying the aftermath of a U.S. Cavalry lead assault on a reservation including innocents (not to mention providing Indian Chief Scar with a legitimate human dimension) in The Searchers (See: Opening Up a Treasure). Later in his career Ford addressed their unfair treatment (including perhaps some of his own past cinematic transgressions) on a wider scale with Cheyenne Autumn. In Apache (1954), Robert Aldrich gave his central character strong motivation and justification for his extreme response. Don Siegel's underrated The Flaming Star (1960) portrayed the Texan frontier life's prevailing racial intolerance toward Native Americans in harsh realistic terms and Ralph Nelson in 1970's Soldier Blue would go all out in depicting the shocking details of horror inflicted on the peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho villagers at Sand Creek, by Colorado Territory militia in the infamous massacre of 1864. There were other films that bucked the "white-wash" trend as well.

In 1950, two films were released that presented the Indian's perspective most forthrightly: One was Delmer Daves' Broken Arrow in which James Stewart as Tom Jeffords tries to negotiate peace between settlers and the Apaches via their honorably portrayed chief Cochise played by Jeff Chandler. Daves' work was commendable and one of the very few sympathetic portrayals of the Indians' plight up to that time, but its tone was optimistic and might as well have been a Disney fantasy compared to the other film released that year: Anthony Mann's stark and spirit crushingly pessimistic Devil's Doorway

The Civil War is over. Returning home to Medicine Bow, Wyoming is Congressional Medal of Honor winner Lance Poole, a full-blooded Shoshone Indian (magnificently portrayed by Robert Taylor). Instead of being greeted with honour and respect for his distinguished service to his Country, he's confronted with some of the townspeople's strong racial prejudice: It seems he can barely get a drink at the bar, medical help for his elderly father or even think about romance with a white woman. Then there's Verne Coole: A scheming lawyer (Louis Calhearn, who might as well be an attorney after his convincing performances in this and The Asphalt Jungle) who deeply covets the great amount of beautiful land Poole owns...(its entrance refers to the film's title). Poole seeks out his own legal representation by way of Orrie Masters (Paula Raymond) who will first petition the Government for a redress of its policy regarding Indians owning land and then try and have the Cavalry stop Coole's takeover by force. But will she make it in time?

This practically unknown gem of a film is the great Anthony Mann's first and best Western, and he made many...(great westerns that is). The actors are all superb. You can read every thought, feel every emotion all of the characters experience, even marginal, unsympathetic ones. The gutsy, no punches pulled screenplay is by Guy Trosper (a Wyoming native himself and lost to us way too early at age 52) who would go on to author another fine and unusual Western, One Eyed Jacks, not to mention adapting what is probably Cinema's best espionage film: The Spy Who Came in From the Cold.  The gorgeous black and white cinematography is by Mann's frequent collaborator John Alton, heretofore most recognized for his sensational work in the film noir genre, including Mann's excellent T-Men and Raw Deal . A special note of gratitude goes to Producer Nicholas Nayfack for his courageous assistance in providing us with this most magnificent motion picture.

These talented collaborators successfully brought perhaps the most personal tragedy ever witnessed on film: That is, one man's fight to protect his home. And what a fight it is at the film's climactic showdown, filled with action and suspense. But the excitement that might have prevailed is totally offset by the terror of it all, including the constant threat of extreme violence to those who have already suffered so much at the hands of hate. Although we are spared the graphic visual specifics of this violent conflict, its fundamental horror is no less powerful than Sam Peckinpah's homestead protection finale in Straw Dogs.       

Of all the films on my Top Ten List of Westerns, this is by far the least seen or recognized. That's in part due to the film's lack of commercial success. Audiences must have heard about the film's negative views toward their Country's Indian relations, its defeatist tone (including a bombshell of a climax rich in tragic irony), and stayed away in droves. It's unceremonious release as a "B" feature (on the second half of a double bill) didn't help. Broken Arrow's pleas for tolerance plus it's compassionate and articulate representative Jeffords met with a positive audience response, but who wanted to witness one man's journey into hell on earth, containing frightfully realistic scenes of greed, racial bigotry and judicial indifference? Devil's Doorway however remains the far superior cinematic drama, unsurpassed in poignancy, and not so much because it exposes the hard truth of history, but because this time...it's personal!

A.G.     

How To Best  Appreciate This Gem:

Hidden Gem #19 is available on this "Made On Demand" DVD from Warner Archives. This is an excellent transfer:

Devil's Doorway
$10.99
Starring Robert Taylor, Louis Calhern, Paula Raymond, Marshall Thompson, James Mitchell

End Credits #21: Cinema's 2013 Lost Treasures Montage Part 5

Some of Cinema's 2013 Lost Treasures. The music by Stanley Myers is from the film Cold Heaven.

"Now Listen To Me..."

Just some thoughts on current happenings:


Long before the internet came along, film lovers searched high and low for any information, feedback or opinion, anything they could find that would help them decide which movies to watch on television. Sadly and quietly, one of the forefathers of movie rating guides passed away a little over a month ago:

Steven H. Scheuer (January 9, 1926 – May 31, 2014) a prominent TV and film critic has died age 88. He produced World: Comm and The Television Annual: 1978/1979 and was editor of Movies on TV, the first book of its kind (originally titled TV Movie Almanac and Ratings), published between 1958 and 1993. This pocket reference was totally indispensable to film lovers and preceded Leonard Maltin's popular guide by about a decade. Scheuer also wrote The Movie BookA Comprehensive, Authoritative, Omnibus Volume on Motion Pictures and the Cinema World in 1974.  

A listing from Steven H. Scheuer's 1962 TV Movie Guide

A listing from Steven H. Scheuer's 1962 TV Movie Guide


Paul Mazursky (April 25, 1930 - June 30, 2014), the immensely talented director and actor has died age 84. His first directorial feature was Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice. He went on to direct Down and Out in Beverly Hills and the hidden gem Blume in Love, an insightful character study that managed to artfully balance compelling drama with graceful humour. He gave dedicated performances in many films such as Into the Night and popular television series like The Sopranos and Curb Your Enthusiasm.

 

There are two recommended video releases this month. Both are Blu-rays scheduled for release on July 8th.

The first is a highly stylized, almost trance-induced expression of a cold, violent, machine-like man on a mission. Its hypnotic hold over us comes in part from the fact that we're not really sure if the protagonist (the aptly named Walker, persuasively played by Lee Marvin) is really still alive or just imagining things in his dying moments. Either way, John Boorman's Point Blank is just like its title: Precise, captivating and unforgettable. This post-noir classic is available on a stunning region-free Blu-ray from Warner Bros Home Video.

 

Then there's Max Ophuls' brilliant noir Caught. This compelling character and relationship study delves deeply into a slowly deteriorating marriage between its heroine, the lonely car-hop Leonora Eames (sensitively portrayed by Barbara Bel Geddes) and her newly-wedded husband Smith Ohlrig (a megalomaniac millionaire perfectly tailored for Robert Ryan). Its style combines the best of a Douglas Sirk melodrama with an Orson Welles flair for dark and disturbing narrative surprises. It is a moderately satisfying transfer of this 1949 film, and well worth having on Blu-ray, from Olive Films (Region A locked).  

 

Pictures and info on both of the above Blu-rays plus other new releases can be found on The Cinema Cafe's Pinterest Board. To purchase either title from Amazon U.S., simply click on the above corresponding image.

 

 

 

 

 

For July, the recommended CD Soundtrack is Alfred Newman's dynamically driven score to the film Airport. This CD has long been out of print, but is now currently available on the Japanese MCA label from Screen Archives Entertainment. It can be ordered by clicking on the image. Screen Archives ships worldwide.

 

 

 

There are two recommendations for those enjoying Turner Classic Movies in the U.S. this July:

 

The first is the suspenseful Barbara Stanwyck noir Jeopardy (and no, Alex Trebek is not in it). Stanwyck is sensational and so are her co-stars, Barry Sullivan as her husband in peril and Ralph Meeker as a killer on the run. Its premise is fascinating, and it only gets more intense as it continues towards the ending, which comes as a surprise considering it was made during the production code. I've mentioned this John Sturges directed psychological thriller in an article called: Exploring the Artifacts #3: Code Breakers. It is scheduled to air on TCM Wednesday July 16 at 9:30 am PST. Confirmation can be checked by clicking on the image.


Then there's Ingmar Bergman's masterpiece: The exquisite romantic-comedy Smiles of a Summer Night, one of the finest motion pictures ever made (listed in my Top Ten: World Cinema Treasures). This is scheduled to show on TCM Monday July 28 at 5:00 pm PST. TCM's programming for the month can be viewed by clicking on the image.

 

A.G.

Top Ten: Cinema's Most Treasured Images Part 3 (#21 - 30)

I'll continue with some of Cinema's most treasured images bound to invoke a strong emotional response. Like the previous selections, these will be listed in ascending order with #21 as the most iconic. The narratives' indelible moments are the primary reason these captures were selected. 

30. The Conformist (1970)

30. The Conformist (1970)

29. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

29. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

28. Gilda (1946)

28. Gilda (1946)

27. The Godfather (1972)

27. The Godfather (1972)

26. The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)

26. The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)

25. The Graduate (1967)

25. The Graduate (1967)

24. White Heat (1949)

24. White Heat (1949)

23. The Exorcist (1973)

23. The Exorcist (1973)

22. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

22. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

21. Manhattan (1979)

21. Manhattan (1979)

I know...there are still more.

A.G.

Top Ten: Western Treasures Part 3

This photo of legendary outlaw Billy the Kid was sold at auction for $2million.  

This photo of legendary outlaw Billy the Kid was sold at auction for $2million.

 

Drama is conflict.

Nowhere is that better exemplified than in a less technologically advanced, austere Western setting. Practically since the dawn of Cinema itself, Westerns appeared on the scene with their comparatively short and simple narratives, befitting both the West's preceding closure and this amazing, new storytelling discovery. 

Since then, the best film makers working in this genre have offset their characters' immediate and barer motives with a mature and sophisticated oversight, allowing the setting's simplicity to heighten the dramatic impact while making sure the events described don't become too unrealistic. In less capable hands, an accurate description of frontier living could be pretty dull without some artificially created heroics inserted to liven the proceedings. Filmmakers who attempted to justify their dramatically inflated events by promulgating, or debunking, "the true story" usually wound up only adding an element of pretentiousness to their projects. 

By applying their visionary approach, allowing both the characters and plot to naturally develop, the talented storytellers represented here passionately conveyed the Western's majesty; still looking beyond the obvious to explore its inhabitants' deep thought processes, while maintaining the authenticity of both.

In this third and final part of the series, I will complete this list with the most enlightening and meaningful Westerns ever made, those timeless motion pictures that for all the right reasons, resonate long after the lights go up.  

(For a further introduction, see: Top Ten Western Treasures Part 1 and Top Ten Western Treasures Part 2.)

 

#4. Ride the High Country (1962, U.S.A.)

Director: Sam Peckinpah

Randolph Scott as Gil Westrum (on left) and Joel McCrea as Steve Judd

Randolph Scott as Gil Westrum (on left) and Joel McCrea as Steve Judd

Aging ex-lawman Steve Judd (Joel McCrea) accidentally runs into an old friend Gil Westrum (Randolph Scott) who together with Westrum's much younger partner Heck Longtree (Ron Starr) agree to transport a shipment of gold from a mining community in the High Sierras to a local town's bank. During their journey Gil will try to chip away at Steve's decision to complete the mission honestly, and instead persuade him to keep the gold for themselves. Heck goes his buddy Gil one better saying: "Gold splits better two ways than three."

Things get a little complicated after the three stay the night at a ranch occupied by a strict, bible quoting widower, Joshua Knudsen (R.G. Armstrong, See: End Credits) and his daughter Elsa (Mariette Hartley) who Heck takes a strong liking to. She decides to tag along with the others to get away from her overbearing father and get to the mining town so she can wed Billy Hammond (James Drury). After the marriage goes horribly wrong (Billy, not to mention his seedy sex-starved brothers, basically sees her as property to be ravaged), she's cleverly rescued from the Hammond clan by our trio to be returned to her father's home.

It is at this point in the story where events start to intensify and take on a more meaningful subtext. Gil lets Heck know privately that he was right about Steve not loosening his resolve to do the job right, meaning they'll have to double cross him. However, Heck's attitude has changed since he's developed a newly found respect for the old man and possibly because of his feelings for Elsa. Gil reminds his younger buddy that they made a deal. Heck responds with a softly reluctant "yes sir."

Ron Starr as Heck Longtree and Mariette Hartley as Elsa Knudson

Ron Starr as Heck Longtree and Mariette Hartley as Elsa Knudson

These conflicting loyalties and their profound effect on character would represent themes intelligently explored in this and its director's other works. Here Heck being the far younger of the three is just starting to develop his values while the others are fairly set in theirs. He'll have to choose and that choice will forever be part of who he becomes, as well as how he's seen by others like Elsa and Gil. We've heard Steve previously describe to Gil his early law-breaking days and how this assignment (once its fulfilled honestly with the others' help) can allow him to "enter my house justified" (a personally significant line written by the director specifically for McCrea's Steve Judd). Will Heck reform his opportunistic ideas and become honorable like Steve, betraying Gil's trust, or will he keep his agreement with his law breaking friend and be known as a common outlaw? What of the risks involved in either decision?

That night when Gil tries to quietly make off with the gold, he and Heck get caught by Steve and there's one explosive showdown. Nothing in this scene is embellished in the slightest: It's tense and economically delivered increasing its forcefulness, foreshadowing the exciting events to come.

Warren Oates as Henry Hammond

Warren Oates as Henry Hammond

The next day a couple of the Hammond boys catch up with the group to claim Elsa but Steve refuses them as well. The Hammonds swear they'll get Elsa back, making Steve's situation increasingly challenging and difficult. For one he has to decide whether to untie his two prisoners so they can assist him in fighting off the Hammonds.

Pressure mounts as threats come to all four before and during this story's suspenseful and sensational climax. The heroic poignancy of its final moments cannot be overstated. Like the following films on this list, it will "cash in" on all of the deeply personal character traits its storytellers have subtly planted and nurtured throughout, delivering a devastatingly powerful and everlasting dramatic catharsis.

The filmmakers made an audacious choice of Western hero Randolph Scott (his last performance) for the role of Gil Westrum, the morally questionable opportunist of the two aged friends. Both he and frequent Western star Joel McCrea's casting are truly inspired. That's the word as well for their committed performances and George Bassman's hauntingly beautiful music that perfectly underscores the strong, prevailing bond between the two leads and the grandeur of their surrounds. The majestic widescreen color photography by Lucien Ballard is still another strong asset in providing its audience with an emotionally overwhelming experience.

Sam

Sam

A couple of films later director Peckinpah would explode some of the Western genre's traditional dramatic conventions, confronting his audience with 1969's The Wild Bunch, his crowning artistic achievement. It's only because he took such extreme risks in daring to say so much and succeeded that his 1969 film rates higher on this list than his elegiac Ride the High Country... not because it's any more intelligent or passionate.  

      


A.G.




#3. Devil's Doorway (1950, U.S.A.)

Director: Anthony Mann

Read More







#2. The Searchers (1956, U.S.A.)

Director: John Ford

Read More





#1. The Wild Bunch (1969, U.S.A.)

Director: Sam Peckinpah

Read More

Capturing a Golden Moment #8

In this series I'd like to present some exceptional scenes inspired by cinema's most gifted artists of yesteryear.


North by Northwest (1959)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Scene: "The Auction"

(Cary Grant cleverly gets himself out a jam in one of the master's best exercises in suspense courtesy of Ernest Lehman's ingenious, original sceenplay and the casts' perfect performances.)

North by Northwest is available on Blu-ray and DVD from Amazon below:

North by Northwest (50th Anniversary Edition in Blu-ray Book Packaging)
$25.18
Starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason, Martin Landau
North By Northwest
$5.97
Starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason, Jessie Royce Landis, Leo G. Carroll

The original recording of Bernard Herrmann's fabulous score can currently be ordered by clicking on the image below. (Intrada ships worldwide).

Sterling Silver Dialogue #14

Sterling Silver Dialogue From The Movies: 

Do you know where they're from? Answers coming soon.

 

(After arriving at a secret hiding place for stolen money) "My uncle's grave. He was always good at keeping money so I thought I'd let him keep mine safe."

 

(A beautiful woman upon accidentally bumping into a man) "I'm sorry."

(the man) "I'm not."

 

 

Pool Attendant: "They kept it all incognito. They're gonna collect the body in an ice cream van."

(response) "There's a lot of dignity in that, isn't there? Going out like a raspberry ripple."

 

Casino Manager: "It was a good night. Nothing unusual."

(response) "'Nothing unusual', he says! Eric's been blown to smithereens, Colin's been carved up, and I've got a bomb in me casino, and you say nothing unusual."

 

"Move to the car, Billy, or I'll blow your spine off."

(response) "That's not a shooter, is it, Harold?"

(reply) "Oh don't be silly, Billy. Would I come hunting for you with me fingers?"

 

 

"I'd look good in a mink coat, honey."

(response) "You'd look good in a shower curtain."

 

"You wouldn't kill me in cold blood, would ya?"

(response) "No, I'll let ya warm up a little."

 

 

"Diamond, the only trouble with you is, you'd like to be me. You'd like to have my organization, my influence, my fix. You can't, it's impossible. You think it's money. It's not. It's personality. You haven't got it. You're a cop. Slow. Steady. Intelligent. With a bad temper and a gun under your arm. With a big yen for a girl you can't have. First is first and second is nobody."

 

 

(Nathan, to board members at an advertising agency) "Gentlemen I'd like you to meet Dr. Alvin Weasely. Dr. Weasely is one of the most respected motivational researchers in the country. Harvey's beer has dropped 84 percent. So Dr. Weasely will tell us how the American public really feels about beer. Dr. Weasely."

(Dr. Weasely) "Beer is for men who doubt their masculinity. That's why it's so popular at sporting events and poker games. On a superficial level a glass of beer is a cool, soothing beverage. But in reality... a glass of beer is:  peepee dickie! That's it."

(Nathan) Beautiful!... Beautiful!

 

 

"You know you don't have to act with me, Steve. You don't have to say anything, and you don't have to do anything. Not a thing. Oh, maybe just whistle. You know how to whistle, don't you, Steve? You just put your lips together and... blow."

 

 

"Well, you're about as romantic as a pair of handcuffs."

 

(looking over an undistinguished hotel room) "Hey, I like this. Early nothing."

 

"The main thing is to have the money. I've been rich and I've been poor. Believe me, rich is better."

 

 

(after an assassination) "Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

 

 

"Hope's a funny thing. You can have it even when there ain't no reason for it."

 

"I do think I oughta' kiss you just once, though, for all the times I won't."

Top Ten: Cinema's Most Treasured Images Part 2 (#11 - 20)

I'll continue with some of Cinema's most treasured images bound to invoke a strong emotional response. Like the first 10 selections, these will be listed in ascending order with #11 as the most iconic. The narratives' indelible moments are the primary reason these captures were selected.   

20. Sorcerer (1977)

20. Sorcerer (1977)

19. The Night of the Hunter (1955)

19. The Night of the Hunter (1955)

18. La Jetée (1962)

18. La Jetée (1962)

17. The Third Man (1949)

17. The Third Man (1949)

16. Psycho (1960)

16. Psycho (1960)

15. Un Chien Andalou (1929)

15. Un Chien Andalou (1929)

14. North by Northwest (1959)

14. North by Northwest (1959)

13. The Seven Year Itch (1955)

13. The Seven Year Itch (1955)

12. Battleship Potemkin (1925)

12. Battleship Potemkin (1925)

11. Planet of the Apes (1968)

11. Planet of the Apes (1968)

Still some missing? Feel free to make comments. They are most welcome.

A.G.

P.S. A trivia question for film buffs: Who or what does the name of film #20 literally refer to?

 

Hidden Gems #6

 

Hidden Gem #60: The Steel Trap (1952, U.S.A.)

Director: Andrew L. Stone

This 'man on the run' caper packs an additional wallop of suspense by focusing on our main protagonist's fascinating and unpredictable psychological reactions: One will surprise us with an even riskier "second job" for him to complete.   

 

 

 

 

Hidden Gem #59: The Hill (1965, U.K.)

Director: Sydney Lumet

Far less known than Lumet's earlier play adaptation of 12 Angry Men, this pressure cooker of a story by Ray Rigby is expertly handled by its accomplished director, delivering intense characterizations and performances that burn right through us, including a career best by Sean Connery. (See: Inspecting a Hidden Gem)

 

 

 

 

Hidden Gem #58: Death Note a.k.a. Desu nôto (2006, Japan)

Director: Shusuke Kaneko

A live action translation of a very popular, ingenious Manga/Anime series that's packed with creative characters, wild story elements, sly humour and a dramatically charged battle of strategies, taking us on one hell of a genre-crossing ride.

 

 

 

Hidden Gem #57: Death Note II The Last Name a.k.a. Desu nôto: The last name (2006, Japan)

Director: Shusuke Kaneko

This bold sequel picks up right where the first Death Note left off, introducing additional captivating story twists and exciting conflict resolutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden Gem #56: Diamonds of the Night a.k.a. Démanty noci (1964, Czechoslovakia)

Director: Jan Nemec

Hallucinatory fantasy, brutal reality and Bunuelian imagery are perfectly blended together in this groundbreaking nightmare of two young Jewish concentration camp escapees; from an under appreciated director who importantly formed part of the Czech "new wave" (including Ivan Passer and Milos Forman).

 

 

 

Hidden Gem #55: Your Three Minutes Are Up! (1973, U.S.A.)

Director: Douglas Schwartz

A highly enjoyable mixture of irreverent comedy with a serious examination of developing maturity, this gem contains a wealth of pleasantly engaging interactions between our two diverse lead performers.

 

 

 

 

 

Hidden Gem #54: Patterns (1956, U.S.A.)

Director: Fielder Cook

Personal ambition conflicts with the human values of a newly hired executive thrust into a world of ruthless big business practices, with Rod Serling's acidic dialogue being the fuse that ignites the explosive dramatic fireworks in this emotionally devastating cinematic gem.

 

 

 

 

Hidden Gem #53: The Holy Mountain (1973, Mexico/U.S.A.)

Director: Alexandro Jodorowsky

If you enjoy getting high, do so when seeing this expert satirist's abstract mosaic of absurd, grotesque imagery and sacrilegious symbolism which pokes fun at the idea that there is something meaningful to be made out of life or for that matter, this motion picture.  

 

 

Hidden Gem #52: Dark Hazard (1934, U.S.A.)

Director: Alfred E. Green

One wouldn't expect to find a compulsive gambler so endearing, but this character continuously exhibits such a distinctively warm human kindness, with the added bonus of being portrayed by the great Edward G. Robinson, that's precisely what happens in this little gem guaranteed to put a big grin on your face.

 

 

Hidden Gem #51: Straight Time (1978, U.S.A.)

Director: Ulu Grosbard

Just as Jose Giovanni (an ex-con turned screenwriter) introduced a sensational new perspective of gritty realism into the French crime genre, so did Edward Bunker for its American counterpart, not only writing Straight Time's source novel No Beast So Fierce while in prison, but also co-writing the screenplay and working as a consultant on this supremely acted project.

A.G.

Sterling Silver Dialogue #13

Sterling Silver Dialogue From The Movies: 

Do you know where they're from? Answers coming soon.

 

"You always have a very smooth explanation ready."

(response) "What do you want me to do, learn to stutter?"

 

"I certainly wish you would have invented a more reasonable story. I felt distinctly like an idiot repeating it."

(response) "Don't worry about the story's goofiness. A sensible one would have had us all in the cooler."

 

"Well sir, here's to plain speaking, clear understanding. You're a close-mouthed man?"

(response) "Nah, I like to talk."

(reply) "Better and better. I distrust a close-mouthed man. He generally picks the wrong time to talk and says the wrong things. Talking's something you can't do judiciously, unless you keep in practice. Now, sir. We'll talk, if you like. I'll tell you right out, I am a man who likes talking to a man who likes to talk."

 

"That's wonderful sir, wonderful. I do like a man who tells you right out he's looking out for himself. Don't we all? I don't trust a man who says he's not."

 

"By Gad sir, you are a character, that you are! There's never any telling what you'll say or do next, except that it's bound to be something astonishing."

 

"Keep on riding me and they're gonna be picking iron out of your liver."

 (reply) "The cheaper the crook, the gaudier the patter."

 

 

"Look, I'll make it easy for you. The time has come when you must tell me you have a wife and two adorable children... and this madness between us can't go on any longer."

(response) "Bet you've heard that line often enough."

 

"This is a very strange love affair."

(response) "Why?"

(reply) "Maybe the fact that you don't love me."

 

 

 

"Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?"

"Woof, woof, woof! That's my dog imitation."

"Always with the negative waves Moriarty. Always with the negative waves."

"Arf arf arf... That's my other dog impression."

 

"I'm a seeker too. But my dreams aren't like yours. I can't help thinking that somewhere in the universe there has to be something better than man. Has to be."