The Cinema Cafe

Serving Cinema's Tastiest Treasures

Treasured Images Part 20 (#191 - 200)

 

I'll continue with some of cinema's most treasured images. For those familiar with the scenes represented they're bound to invoke a strong emotional response. The narratives' indelible moments are the primary reason these captures were selected. 

200. The Killing (1956)

200. The Killing (1956)

199. Miller's Crossing (1990)

199. Miller's Crossing (1990)

198. Across the Bridge (1957)

198. Across the Bridge (1957)

197. About Schmidt (2002)

197. About Schmidt (2002)

196. Goodfellas (1990) 

196. Goodfellas (1990) 

195. Titanic (1997)

195. Titanic (1997)

194. It Happened One Night (1934)

194. It Happened One Night (1934)

193. Dirty Harry (1971) 

193. Dirty Harry (1971) 

192. The Blue Angel (1930)

192. The Blue Angel (1930)

191. Angels with Dirty Faces (1938)

191. Angels with Dirty Faces (1938)

 

More will come. Any suggestions are welcome in the comments section.

A.G.

(Links to Parts 1 - 20 are here.)

21st Century Treasure Quest #16

 

Our contributor Renard N. Bansale has completed 10 more contemporary film reviews for your consideration. The rating system he'll use is devised primarily to give those who are trying to decide which films to see, a fun and easy way of (hopefully) choosing a more pleasurable movie-going experience. For a further introduction to this series please see 21st Century Treasure Quest #1. (A.G.)

 

The Ratings

1 chest: Definitely worth missing
2 chests: Okay to kill some time
3 chests: Not a complete success, but rewarding
4 chests: Well-crafted, creative and memorable
5 chests: A real treasure, deep, profound and original

 

 

 

CHiPS (2017—Director: Dax Shepard)

CHiPs.jpeg

Writer-director Dax Shepard (NBC's Parenthood) cobbles together a vulgar and unfunny buddy cop action comedy masquerading as an adaptation of the late '70s NBC series of the same name. Despite a few decent motorcycle sequences, little drama or comedy fails to materialize. Furthermore, Shepard tries too hard for unearned attention in his performance, while co-star Michael Peña receives little to no sympathy for his character's unsettling sexual addiction.

1 & Half Chests.png

 

 

 

 

The Circle (2017—Director: James Ponsoldt)

Circle.jpg

Emma Watson (Harry Potter) does her best to carry writer-director James Ponsoldt (The Spectacular Now, The End of the Tour) and co-writer Dave Egger's disappointing adaptation of Egger's 2013 novel. The story's focus on society's growing influence of privacy and security never develops into the complex and gripping thriller it sets out to become. Thus, a disjointed and slack narrative that neglects the talents of Ms. Watson's co-stars (among them Tom Hanks, John Boyega, and the late Bill Paxton in his final role), also flounders toward an ambiguous and anticlimactic finish.

2 Chests.png

 

 

 

 

The Last Word (2017—Director: Mark Pellington)

LastWord.jpeg

Shirley MacLaine and Amanda Seyfried match each other's tenacity and desire for joie de vivre in the cinematic realization of Stuart Ross Fink's quietly poignant script. Even with child actor AnnJewel Lee Dixon's short but charismatic supporting turn, it is clear that the Mark Pellington directed film would not contain nearly the lifeblood without the presence of its two aforementioned female stars.

3 Chests.png

 

 

 

 

Life (2017—Director: Daniel Espinosa)

Life.jpeg

Director Daniel Espinosa (Safe House, Child 44) and Deadpool screenwriters Rhett Reece and Paul Wernick admirably attempt to fuse their story from borrowed elements of Alien, Sunshine, and Gravity. The series of poor decisions made by the mildly engaging ensemble are more characteristic of a low-brow slasher flick than a thought-provoking sci-fi thriller, causing the film's momentum to slow to a crawl, all the way to the film's cut-rate twist ending.

3 Chests.png

 

 

 

 

My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea (2017—Director: Dash Shaw)

MyEntireHSSinkingIntoTheSea.jpg

Comic book writer and animator Dash Shaw employs the limited but effective tools of Photoshop to piece together this visually imaginative take on an earthquake interrupting the unhinged adolescent antics at a seaside high school. Shaw was wise to keep to a 75 minute runtime which paces the story at a rate that prevents its more generic elements from overstaying their welcome. 

3 & Half Chests.png

 

 

 

 

Personal Shopper (2017—Director: Olivier Assayas)

PersonalShopper.jpeg

Writer-director Olivier Assayas (Carlos, Clouds of Sils Maria) has locked onto a great muse in former Twilight lead Kristen Stewart who stars in this unconventional and captivating ghost story. Assayas deserved the 2016 Cannes Film Festival's Best Director award especially for the sequences involving the most tense exchange of text messages yet captured on film. These help to offset the overuse of fade-to-black transitions.

3 & Half Chests.png

 

 

 

 

Song to Song (2017—Director: Terrence Malick)

SongToSong.jpeg

The illustrious Terrence Malick continues to tap into his affinity with nature treating the relationship as a sort of spatial enigma in this love triangle travelogue. Emmanuel "Chivo" Lubezki's gorgeous cinematography compensates for the plot line's lack of urgency. While certainly a "lesser" Malick work, Song to Song manages to hypnotize and enthrall committed viewers all the same.

3 & Half Chests.png

 

 

 

 

T2 Trainspotting (2017—Director: Danny Boyle)

T2Trainspotting.jpeg

Director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire, Steve Jobs) and writer John Hodge craft a belated but most worthy sequel to the 1996 British classic that put them and the cast—led by Ewan McGregor (Star Wars prequels)—on the map. The story foregoes the original's slice-of-life approach for a more straightforward plot that emphasizes the melancholic nostalgia of its unforgettable main quartet of characters portrayed by McGregor, along with Ewen Bremner, Jonny Lee Miller, and Robert Carlyle. In addition, the skillful efforts throughout resurrect and update the original's frenetic, MTV-inspired visuals with sheer joy and love.

4 Chests.png

 

 

 

 

Their Finest (2017—Director: Lone Scherfig)

TheirFinest.jpg

Danish director Lone Scherfig (An Education, The Riot Club) and writer Gaby Chiappe (BBC's EastEnders) brings Britain's domestic World War II environment delightfully to life in this adaptation of Lissa Evans' 2009 novel. Gemma Arterton (Quantum of Solace, The Girl with All the Gifts) and Sam Claflin (The Hunger Games franchise, My Cousin Rachel) possess charm and chemistry together playing screenwriters for pro war films. Alongside them, Bill Nighy (Love Actually, Pirates of the Caribbean) steals scenes as the seasoned thespian who learns to accept and welcome the acting opportunities befitting of his advancing age.

3 & Half Chests.png

 

 

 

 

The Zookeeper's Wife (2017—Director: Niki Caro)

Zookeeper'sWife.jpeg

Director Niki Caro (Whale Rider, North Country) and writer Angela Workman adapt Diane Ackerman's 2007 non-fiction book to contribute to the list of worthwhile but mostly unremarkable Holocaust films (relative to Schindler's List, The Pianist, and Son of Saul, for example). The zookeeper is deftly played by Johan Heldenbergh (The Broken Circle Breakdown) and his efforts to spirit away Jews from the Warsaw ghetto through the zoo is grippingly portrayed. Far less dramatically effective is the flirtatious act his wife, played by Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty, A Most Violent Year), puts on for the nefarious Nazi officer played by Daniel Brühl (Inglourious Basterds, Rush) watching their every move.

3 Chests.png

 

R.N.B.

"Now Listen To Me..."

 

Just some thoughts on current happenings: 

 

There are 16 recommended films to watch on Turner Classic Movies in the U.S. this month:

 

 

Double Indemnity's squeaky clean working man who winds up sullied by an alluring temptress is creatively tied in with Rear Window's voyeuristic framework in 1954's incendiary film noir Pushover

Fred MacMurray, Kim Novak

Fred MacMurray, Kim Novak

Instead of Double Indemnity's insurance agent, this time Fred MacMurray's "pushover" is cop Paul Sheridan, assigned to stake-out a bank robber's moll, Lona McLane, played by the devastatingly gorgeous Kim Novak in her first credited role. Both are perfectly cast: MacMurray has that devious, authoritatively smooth, fast talking persona down pat. He's cool under fire unless it's the hot melting blaze of Novak, who replaces Barbara Stanwyck's hard, scheming edginess in Double Indemnity with a soft, curvaceous vulnerability. As Sheridan and McLane become increasingly embroiled in each other and their criminal plans, so do we. This is mostly due to the expert helmsmanship of the under-appreciated director Richard Quine, whose forte was probing his characters' disoriented, desperate and often lovesick souls in films such as this, Drive a Crooked Road (1954), and Strangers When We Meet (1960). Perhaps the director had a personal affinity for these types: Quine's marital engagement to his often employed leading lady Novak ended abruptly and in 1989, at age 68, he committed suicide. Aside from a successful foray into romantic comedy with films like The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956), Bell Book and Candle (1958), The Notorious Landlady (1962), and Paris When It Sizzles (1964), Quine directed the outstanding dramas Hotel (1967), and The Moonshine War (1970). Pushover's engaging screenplay was written by Roy Huggins, best known for creating the TV series The Fugitive (1963 - 1967), and was adapted from the novel "The Night Watch" by Thomas Walsh, also the author of another excellent film noir, Union Station (1950). Pushover boasts a strong supporting cast including Philip Carey, Dorothy Malone and E.G. Marshall, but its real strength lies in effectively communicating the hopes and dreams of our central couple, mightily motivated against a formidably steep uphill climb. Even so, there are film noir's reoccurring signs of knowing that the desperation behind that motivation must ultimately seal their tragic fates. Viewers can better appreciate Quine's specialised directorial skill at exploring the film noir universe when Pushover airs Sunday, December 3 at 7am PST, the next film in Eddie Muller's Noir Alley

 

 

 

 

 

Immediately following Pushover, that perennial holiday favourite The Shop Around the Corner, previously recommended here, will open for business and our viewing pleasure. This delightful film will air three times this month: Sunday, December 3 at 9am... Friday, December 15 at 5 pm...  and Monday, December 25 at 3pm. All of the listed showtimes are Pacific Standard Time.

Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart

Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart

 

 

 

 

The Hill, Hidden Gem # 59, is one of cinema's most intense dramatic achievements. This hard-hitting British gem has been "inspected" (reviewed) here. It is scheduled to air on TCM Monday, December 4 at 1pm PST. 

 

 

 

 

My next recommendation is a film a few of you may have heard about: 1944's Academy Award Best Picture Winner Casablanca. This choice may come as a surprise to readers more familiar with my past articles since it is included on a list of overrated films, and reviewed for those same individuals here. There is no denying the fact that this film casts a magical spell and is certainly capable of sweeping one up in its appealing blend of romance, sacrifice and political intrigue. Besides, for those who haven't seen it, or seen it enough, how are they to know if my criticisms are sound? This 1942 classic, one of Hollywood's proudest, airs Friday, December 8 at 8:45am PST and again on Saturday, December 16 at 1pm PST.

 

 

 

 

Film noir has few representatives as dourly defeatist or as forcefully communicative on the subject of human relations than 1945's Scarlet Street, previously reviewed here. Edward G. Robinson as Christopher Cross, will take his fateful walk down that dark and foreboding street Monday, December 11 (early morning) at 4:45am PST.

 

 

 

Another Edward G. Robinson film to see is Dark HazardHidden Gem #52. This has also been previously reviewed as a TCM recommendation here. He’ll race from the gate Tuesday, December 12 at 10:45am PST. 

Genevieve Tobin, Edward G. Robinson, Dark Hazard

Genevieve Tobin, Edward G. Robinson, Dark Hazard

 

 

 

 

Although many have compared the re-make unfavourably to a previous version released a decade earlier, 1941's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde has many attributes as well including a noir-like focus on the title physician's more beastly and repressed thoughts and desires. This previous TCM recommendation has been reviewed here. The Dr. will begin his transformation Tuesday, December 12 at 11:30pm PST.

Montage effects by Peter Ballbusch

Montage effects by Peter Ballbusch

 

 

 

 

Ace in the Hole is Billy Wilder's scathing examination of American opportunism and moral depravity via cocky newspaper reporter Chuck Tatum, played with unrelenting cynical ferociousness by Kirk Douglas, a film previously reviewed here. Both director and actor will play their hand Wednesday, December 13 at 6:45pm PST. 

Jan Sterling, Kirk Douglas

Jan Sterling, Kirk Douglas

 

 

 

 

Next is Barbara Loden's incredible directorial debut WandaHidden Gem #29, a previous TCM recommendation here. Her appearance will occur on TCM Wednesday, December 13 at 9pm PST.

(In forefront) Barbara Loden

(In forefront) Barbara Loden

 

 

 

 

My next TCM recommendation comes with a caveat: If you haven't seen the film before, please do so before reading my review. Doctor Zhivago is the latest in a series of Top Ten Fool's Gold: The Overrated and will be shown on TCM Thursday, December 14 at 7am PST.

Julie Christie, Omar Sharif

Julie Christie, Omar Sharif

TCM's current schedule can be confirmed by clicking on the above image. For those who live in parts of the U.S. other than the western region, the time zone can be adjusted in the upper right-hand corner of TCM's programme. 

(To be continued... )             A.G.       

Sterling Silver Dialogue #23

 

Sterling Silver Dialogue From The Movies: 

sweetsmellofsuccess2.jpg

Do you know where they're from? Answers coming soon.

Special Film Noir Edition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"You know how it is, early in the morning, on the water? Everything’s quiet, except for the seagulls, a long way off. And you feel great. Then you come ashore, and it starts. And in no time at all, you’re up to your ears in trouble. And you don’t know where it began."

 

 

"You ever been locked up?"

(response) "Not the way you mean."

(reply) "I don't care what way it is. Some people can stand it and some people can't. The ones who can't would kill themselves and anybody else just to get out for five minutes."

 

"You don't think very much of people, do you?"

(response) "I don't think very much of anything."

 

 

"In this world, you turn the other cheek and you get hit with a lug wrench."

 

 

"Don’t ever change Tiger. I don’t think I’d like you with a heart."

 

 

"She looked like a very special kind of dynamite, neatly wrapped in nylon and silk. Only I wasn't having any. I'd been too close to one explosion already. I was powder shy."

 

 

"It's too bad Nick took the car."

(response) "Even if it was here we couldn't take it, unless we'd want to spend the night in jail. Stealing a man's wife, that's nothing... but stealing a man's car, that's larceny."

 

 

"I don't like this place."

(response) "It's a good spot. I used to come here with my girl when I was a kid. It's more frightening than romantic. It's the way love is when you're young... life is when you're older."

 

 

"What’s happened to business, anyway? Got nothin’ to do but sit here dopin’ the horses. How do you like Killie in the 7th?"

(response) "Eh, she’ll still be runnin’ when they start the 8th."

 

 

"Oh, your breakfast is on the table, darling."

(response) "Where else would it be?"

 

 

"They tried to get her last night."

(response) "They? A wonderful word. And who are they? They're the nameless ones who kill people for the great whatsit. Does it exist? Who cares? Everyone everywhere is so involved in the fruitless search for what? Why don't you turn her over to Pat? It's his job to protect her, if she needs protection. Or to question her if that's what's needed. Why are you always tryin' to make a noise like a cop?"

 

 

"I never met Parry... but I know psychologically he's no killer. He was just dumb.

(response) "What makes you think you're so smart. All you know is T-squares and drafting boards and not even much about them or anything else!"

(reply) "We've been through all of that before! A couple of hundred thousand times. A couple of hundred thousand years ago when I was a monkey and thought I wanted to marry you."

 

 

(To the partygoers) "Seems I've lost my manners or would anyone here know the difference?"

 

 

"What do you know about anything? You probably had your bread buttered on both sides since the day you were born. Safe. Safe on first, second, third, and home."

 

 

"You're dead, son. Get yourself buried."

"Don't remove the gangplank, Sidney, you may wanna get back onboard."

"The cat's in the bag and the bag's in the river."

 

"Now Listen to Me..."

Just some thoughts on current happenings: 

Read More

Capturing a Golden Moment #19: The Drowning Pool

 

The Drowning Pool (1975)

 

Director: Stuart Rosenberg

 

Scene: "The Drowning Pool"

 

This is an investigative sequel, of sorts, to 1966's Harper, with Paul Newman reprising his role as Lew Harper, private detective. The original is the one to see, with its more intriguing premise, creatively delivered storyline, and colourful characters to hold our attention. The Drowning Pool does, however, have the title scene's showstopper: Distinctive, suspenseful and wonderfully created by everyone involved behind and in front of the camera. If only the rest of the film delivered half the inspiration found here. *Warning: Some may find its brutal, intense nature disturbing. 

 

 

 

The Drowning Pool is available on this DVD-R here:

Drowning Pool, The
$12.99
Starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Tony Franciosa, Murray Hamilton, Gail Strickland

 

It is also available for U.S. download here:

The Drowning Pool
$2.99
Starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Tony Franciosa, Murray Hamilton, Gail Strickland

 

And in this box set of 7 Paul Newman films here:

 

A.G.

"Now Listen to Me..."

Just some thoughts on current happenings: 

Read More

21st Century Treasure Quest #15

Our contributor Renard N. Bansale has completed 10 more contemporary film reviews for your consideration. The rating system he'll use is devised primarily to give those who are trying to decide which films to see, a fun and easy way of (hopefully) choosing a more pleasurable movie-going experience. For a further introduction to this series please see 21st Century Treasure Quest #1. (A.G.)

Read More

"Now Listen to Me..."

Just some thoughts on current happenings: 

Read More

End Credits #72: Cinema's 2017 Lost Treasures Tobe Hooper

Along with Wes Craven (August 2, 1939 - August 30, 2015), who died just two years ago, and the most recent loss of George Romero (February 4, 1940 - July 16, 2017), horror fans now mourn the loss of yet another master filmmaker who excelled in the genre: Writer, director, producer and actor Tobe Hooper (January 25, 1943 - August 26, 2017), who has died at age 74.

 

Guest contributor Bob DiMucci has provided this tribute to his filmmaking career:

 

The Films of Tobe Hooper

 

 

Read More

Sterling Silver Dialogue #22

 

Sterling Silver Dialogue From The Movies: 

Do you know where they're from? Answers coming soon.

OUT_OF_THE_PAST1_120170827225023993.jpg

Special Film Noir Edition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I can be framed easier than 'Whistler's Mother'.

 

 

"Those gates only open three times: When you come in, when you've served your time, or when you're dead."

 

 

"Is he dead?"

(response) "He was dead for a long time... He just didn't know it."

 

 

"Wanna drink?"

(response) "I never drink. You're very nervous."

(reply) "That's because I've never been killed before." 

 

 

"Do you fall in love with all of your clients?"

(response) "Only the ones in skirts."

 

 

"Mr. Campbell, as long as we're on this little jaunt together, you and I are going to stick so close together, we could wear the same pair of suspenders." 

 

 

"I saw the two of you, the way you were looking at each other tonight, like a couple of wild animals. Almost scared me."

(response) "It should. He's a man."

 

 

"Charles, at times your charm wears dangerously thin. Right now it's so thin I can see through it."

 

 

"You know a dame with a rod is like a guy with a knitting needle."

 

"Besides, Joe couldn't find a prayer in the Bible."

 

"You're no good and neither am I. That's why we deserve each other." 

 

 

"It's a dirty job but I pay clean money for it."

 

 

"Experience has taught me never to trust a policeman. Just when you think one's all right, he turns legit."

 

 

"A policeman's job is only easy in a police state."

 

"Come on, read my future for me."

(response) "You haven't got any."

(reply) "Hmm... What do you mean?"

(response) "Your future's all used up."

 

 

"Why should the Falls drag me down here at 5 o'clock in the morning? To show me how big they are and how small I am? To remind me they can get along without any help? All right, so they've proved it. But why not? They've had ten thousand years to get independent. What's so wonderful about that? I suppose I could too, only it might take a little more time."